Details

      Description

      Under some conditions, for instance if a type parameter is present, the default argument value of a method parameter is not printed. Try for example:

      trait Test {
        def f   (a: Seq[List[Any]] = Seq.empty[List[Any]])
        def g[A](a: Seq[List[A]]   = Seq.empty[List[A]])
      }
      

      Imo it would be satisfactory to print the textual representation of the default argument (see also SI-3721).

        Activity

        Hide
        Sonnenschein added a comment -

        Seemingly, text effects do not work as described, so the code again:

        trait Test

        { def f (a: Seq[List[Any]] = Seq.empty[List[Any]]) def g[A](a: Seq[List[A]] = Seq.empty[List[A]]) }
        Show
        Sonnenschein added a comment - Seemingly, text effects do not work as described, so the code again: trait Test { def f (a: Seq[List[Any]] = Seq.empty[List[Any]]) def g[A](a: Seq[List[A]] = Seq.empty[List[A]]) }
        Hide
        Sonnenschein added a comment -

        Hi,
        sorry but it's not obvious to me why you are downgrading this issue from Critical to Minor.

        I do think it is critical if the Scaladoc reader cannot see the full signature of a methods because the default value for arguments is missing. Then he thinks he must provide all arguments on any call and that makes his code more complicated. It is as if Scaladoc would not mention implicit parameters, isn’t it?

        Looking at the Jira definition of severity, I maintain that Critical (loss of data) or at least Major (major loss of function) would be appropriate.

        Feel free to tell me if I can help you in any way.

        Peter

        Show
        Sonnenschein added a comment - Hi, sorry but it's not obvious to me why you are downgrading this issue from Critical to Minor. I do think it is critical if the Scaladoc reader cannot see the full signature of a methods because the default value for arguments is missing. Then he thinks he must provide all arguments on any call and that makes his code more complicated. It is as if Scaladoc would not mention implicit parameters, isn’t it? Looking at the Jira definition of severity, I maintain that Critical (loss of data) or at least Major (major loss of function) would be appropriate. Feel free to tell me if I can help you in any way. Peter
        Hide
        Paul Phillips added a comment -

        Sorry. The bug database sucks beyond all comprehension. Since anyone can set any priority to a ticket, the existing ~1000 tickets have a mix of priorities I have set and arbitrary priorities chosen by anyone. I need some way to communicate priorities so I went around the database lowering the priority of all the ones which are higher than the default where I did not personally raise it.

        About this bug, from one standpoint it's easy to agree, and from another, no scaladoc bug is going to compete for the very small space I have in which to place higher priority bugs.

        Show
        Paul Phillips added a comment - Sorry. The bug database sucks beyond all comprehension. Since anyone can set any priority to a ticket, the existing ~1000 tickets have a mix of priorities I have set and arbitrary priorities chosen by anyone. I need some way to communicate priorities so I went around the database lowering the priority of all the ones which are higher than the default where I did not personally raise it. About this bug, from one standpoint it's easy to agree, and from another, no scaladoc bug is going to compete for the very small space I have in which to place higher priority bugs.
        Show
        Jason Zaugg added a comment - https://github.com/scala/scala/pull/1744

          People

          • Assignee:
            Jason Zaugg
            Reporter:
            Sonnenschein
          • Votes:
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            • Created:
              Updated:
              Resolved:

              Development